The Nobility of the Northern Forests

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His Grace Duke William of Pineland 
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Richard Johnson, Lord of Eastcourt
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Laura Duchesne,Baroness of Roustad

Nobility

The Princess may, from time to time, issues titles of Nobility that existed in pre-14th century Scandinavia. The rank advancements include:

  • Duchess/Duke - Rules a Duchy 

  • Countess/Count - Rules a County 

  • Baroness/Baron - Rules a Barony

  • Dame/Knight - Rules a small section of land

  • Lady/Lord of the Manor - Rules a small farm

The Princess may, from time to time, issue titles of Nobility using the old Norse system which make up the Princess's Hird. The rank advancements include:

  • Jarl - Equivalent to a Countess/Count

  • Lendmann - Equivalent to a Baroness/Baron

  • Skutilsvein- Equivalent to a Dame/Knight

  • Lagmann - Known as the Lawspeaker

 

Worth clarifying here is that Royal Guards (Huskarls) are made up of Dames/Knights or the Skutilsvein and Nobility of the Principality and are not themselves considered a Noble rank or title .

 

The Lagmann

Generally, the Ting is overseen by the Lagmann (Lawspeaker). Typically the Lawspeaker chooses their successor unless they resign or die without designating one - in which case; the Princess of the Northern Forests will select someone to officially take over their duties.

Knights, Dames & the Skutilsvein

There are only two Royal Orders of Knighthood in the Northern Forests; the Royal Order of Arctic Knights (the lowest) and the Royal Order of the Crown of the Northern Forests (the highest).  The title of Grand Skutilsvein only conveys nobility if stated in the Letters Patent and them alone. It will be as either a hereditary or life title upon the grantee unless otherwise stated. Nobility is not conveyed at any other rank. Hereditary Knighthoods are generally quite rare.

Honourary Nobility

The Princess may, from time to time grant Honourary Nobility titles, but they are quite rare and nearly never awarded. When they are, it is granted for the person's lifetime and they are never hereditary. Honourary titles cannot be purchased, transferred or sold and do not grant any legal privileges nor any rights associated with them. They are completely a lifetime incorporeal herediment with no land, no Fief and rarely have any feudal duties attached to them. 
 

There are no other ranks or distinctions of the Nobility in the Principality of the Northern Forests that is not listed here.